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CORONAVIRUS: RESOURCES FOR CHILDREN

by Demiana Willing

Heya! So it’s been a big week or two, with lots of changes all around us; at home, at school and even at the park. Some of us might have mixed feelings about these changes; some good feelings and some not so good feelings happening all at once inside our body and brain.

Today, for this blog let us focus on our feelings of worry, sadness, and maybe even fear. See, our brain likes it when our life has a routine because our brain likes to know what to expect to prepare for it. Lots of changes may cause our brain’s alarm system to ‘switch on’. This might make us feel that we are in danger, and even helpless about not being able to keep safe ourself or those who we love.

The first thing to remember during these times of big changes that ‘I AM NOT ALONE IN THESE FEELINGS’. We all worry about being safe, about the dangers that we and those we love are in. We are all sad and fearful at times about what we hear on the news. We have all of these feelings for different reasons, but they are still the same feelings.

Although it’s a difficult time, and we don’t see our friends and loved ones as much as we normally do, we all have to try and remember that it is important to find ways to connect to one another during this time. So having a conversation with your family or friends about how to see and talk to each other using different apps or devices may help you start to plan ahead.

Each blog we will focus on something that we can all do together to help keep our brain and body feeling calm through this time of change. For today let’s all watch this YouTube clip by Kim St Lawrence titled ‘Time to come in bear: A children’s social story about social distancing’

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